I was reading some of my old posts, and I realized something: I’ve never told you about my Canadian Production Wheel, Eugenie.

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This is what she looked like when I first received her. I had won her on an eBay auction last May, and a fellow Raveller was traveling down to Georgia and South Carolina within the week after the end of the auction and she offered to pick her up. So, khyricat picked up my wheel from the Atlanta area and drove her all the way to Ohio, where she met up with mirranda2. Mirranda2 drove out to Granville about a month later, where we met up one day in early or mid-June. A couple of hours later, I had her back home in Worthington and this is her first picture. As I examined her, I noticed several things, such as a lot of grime, white spots all over the spinner’s side, and the shellac had alligatored on the same side–I suspect that for years, she had been used as a decoration, perhaps either sitting in front of a large window, or perhaps even in front of a fireplace.

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As you can see from her hub and uprights, she was pretty grimy. I seriously do not want to know what the grime was!

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The inside of her rim, and one of the spokes, with a glimpse of the dirty table.

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At first, I thought the white spots had been mold, but upon careful cleaning and inspection, it turned out to be white paint spatters. As I shared this pic on Ravelry, it was suggested that I call her “Polluck”. (I’m glad I didn’t 🙂 ). As you can see, the cast iron fitting in the upper right needed a good seasoning.

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The wing nut is unusual in that instead of looking like it has a chicken head (as many CPWs do), it looks more like a turkey, and there is a capital letter B on its “tail”.

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Her flyer, which is original to the day she was made.

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Her cast iron treadle, which also needed a good seasoning. The cross bar, that goes at an angle from the pivot bar and attaches to the treadle and the footman, has faint traces of really old paint. You can’t really tell from the photo above, but in sunlight I can make out “187-“. The fourth number has been obliterated with time.

I gave her a bath with Murphy’s oil soap, and the water was a really disgusting black when I dumped it out. Since it was raining that day, and she had just had a bath, I let her rest in the garage for a couple days until I could get back to her again.

Finally, on a free, dry, and gorgeous day, I was able to get started on the mother-of-all (MOA). I bought some denatured alcohol, some terrycloth rags, and some chemical-resistant gloves. After lots and lots of rubbing and scrubbing, this is what I ended up with:

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Ain’t it purty? And I absolutely fell in love with the wood grain that just popped out from under all that nasty shellac.

From then on, I gradually reamalgamated the shellac on most of the entire thing. After about 2-3 weeks, I was satisfied with the reamalgamation, but the denatured alcohol really dried out her wood. So, I made a trip to Whole Foods and picked up a quart of walnut oil. Using another terrycloth rag, I began rubbing the oil into the wood. I think I gave her about 5 coats of oil before she stopped drinking it in. So, here she is, below, after a fresh coat of oil:

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Isn’t she pretty? I just love the tiger maple spokes, table, legs, and MOA. I have no idea what the wheel rim is made of, but it sure is gorgeous.

She is such a dream to spin with, and I’m sorry to say she’s been a tad neglected lately; I need to give her another coat of walnut oil since my new residence is so dry in the wintertime, and I really need to spend some time spinning with her.

Anyway, I just wanted to share a little bit about her. There’s just something about antique spinning wheels that just call to me, and I’m glad she found me. 🙂

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