Ostrich Feather Fandango Shawl


Copyright 2008 by TraMari Designs.

I’ve had numerous requests for a cleaned-up pattern for this shawl, and I’ve finally been able to reorganize and re-post it here at this new location. For those of you who have been waiting an incredibly long time, I humbly apologize for taking so long, and for the confusion of the former location. Anyway, without further ado, here is the pattern:

–PLEASE READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS, INCLUDING THE NOTES AT THE END OF THE PATTERN, BEFORE ENDEAVORING TO BEGIN YOUR SHAWL. THE NOTES FOLLOWING THE PATTERN WILL BE TO YOUR BENEFIT, AS THE SHAWL IS NOT SYMMETRICAL WHEN THE PATTERN IS BEING WORKED. THIS PATTERN IS ALSO NOT FOR A CROCHETER WITH LIMITED EXPERIENCE; HOWEVER, IF YOU WISH TO EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS AND NEED ASSISTANCE WITH THIS PATTERN, FEEL FREE TO CONTACT ME. THANK YOU.–

1/25/2011–I am concerned that folks are getting stuck around rows 21-22. I am investigating this issue, and will attempt to figure out what is going on so that I can explain the pattern more fully. Again, if you have questions or concerns, PLEASE feel free to leave a comment and I will address it as thoroughly as possible. –TMM

Materials:
750 yds. dk-weight or sportweight yarn, or about 1000 yds. laceweight–this laceweight number is an approximation, as I used the wrong weight yarn when making my original; for a large shawl, please remember to buy one more skein than you think you will need just to make sure. I will be revisiting this pattern at some point in the future and will have a more accurate count at that time.

If using a dk-weight yarn, use at least a Boye size J or K hook. If using a laceweight, a 4.25 mm or larger hook will suffice

Instructions:

Row 1: Ch 5, (dc, ch1) 3 times in 5th ch from hook, dc in same sp, ch 4, turn.

Row 2: Turning ch counts as (dc, ch 1). (Dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc in next dc, ch 1) across, dc in next ch-1 sp, dc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 5, turn.

Row 3: Ch-5 counts as (dc, ch 2). (Dc in next dc, ch 2) across, ending w/ dc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 4, turn.

Row 4: Ch-4 counts as (dc, ch 1). (Dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, dc in next dc, ch 1) across, ending w/ dc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 1, turn.

Row 5: Sc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, *sk next dc, 5 dc in next dc–shell made, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * across, ending w/ sc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 3, turn.

Row 6: 2 dc in same st as turning ch, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, [(dc, ch 1) 4 times, dc] in next sc–open shell made, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) twice, open shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, 3 dc in last sc. Ch 1, turn.

Row 7: Sc in same st as turning ch, sk 2 dc, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk 2 dc, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, sc in top of 3rd ch of turning ch, ch 3, turn.

Row 8: (Dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, dc in sc, ch 3, turn.

Row 9: (Dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 8 times, dc2tog–skipping the sc in the middle–(dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 8 times, dc in next 2 dc. Ch 1, turn.

Row 10: Sc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, sk next dc, (shell in next dc, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc) 11 times, ch 1, sc in last dc. Ch 3, turn.

Row 11: 2 dc in same st as turning ch, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 7 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, 3 dc in next sc. Ch 1, turn.

Row 12: Sc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 3 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 3 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc in same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 5, turn.

Row 13: (Dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) twice, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) twice, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 2) 9 times, dc in next dc, ch 4, turn.

Row 14: (Dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, dc in next dc, ch 1) 8 times, (dc, ch 1) in next ch-2 sp, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 9 times, dc in 3rd ch of turning ch, ch 1, turn.

Row 15: Sc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, sk next dc, (shell in next dc, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc) 5 times, shell in next dc, ch 1, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, ch 1, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, ch 1, sk 2 dc, (shell in next dc, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc) 6 times, sk next dc, 3 dc in 3rd ch of turning ch, ch 1, turn.

Row 16: Sc in same st as turning ch, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) 6 times, ch 1, sk next sc, (shell in next dc, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc) 5 times, shell in next dc, sk next dc and sc, ch 1, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 5 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, 3 dc in last sc. Ch 1, turn.

At this point, the shawl should be about the size of a collar. Yes, there will be “ripples” in the fabric, as well as a scallop-y shape in the center of the neckline. Another set of curves should be starting.

Begin repeating rows: (asterisks {*} should only be used on repeat rows, not during the first time these rows are worked)

Row 17: Sc in same st as turning ch, open shell in next sc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 4 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc, *(sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 5 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc; rep from * to last fan segment, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) 4 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, open shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, 3 dc in last sc. Ch 1, turn.

Basically, work the shells across in this row until you come between the finished fan segments, where you add an open shell.

Row 18: Sc in same st as turning ch, sk next 2 dc of 3-dc group, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 3 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, *(dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) 4 times; rep from * across to last fan segment, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, dc in next dc, (sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc) 3 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times,dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in last sc, ch 5, turn.

Row 19: Ch-5 counts as (dc, ch2). (Dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) twice, *(dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) 3 times; rep from * across to last fan segment, (dc in next dc, ch 2) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) twice, (dc in next dc, ch 2) 9 times, dc in last sc. Ch 4, turn.

Row 20: (Dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, dc in next dc, ch 1) 9 times, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, *(dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell,(shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell) twice; rep from * to last fan segment, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 8 times, dc in next dc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, (dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-2 sp, ch 1) 9 times, dc in 3rd ch of turning ch. Ch 1, turn.

Row 21: Sc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, sk next dc, (shell in next dc, sk next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc) 6 times, shell in next dc, ch 1, sk next dc, *sc in 3rd dc of next shell, sk next 2 dc of same shell, shell in next sc, sk next dc, (sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc, shell in next dc, sk next dc) 5 times, sc in next dc, (shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell)twice, shell in next sc, sk next dc, (sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc, shell in next dc, sk next dc) 5 times, sc in next ch-1 sp, shell in next sc, sc in 3rd dc of next shell, shell in next sc, sk next dc, (sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next dc, shell in next dc, sk next dc) 5 times, sc in next ch-1 sp, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in top of turning ch, ch 1, turn. In repeated rows, continue making shells across the row in the same manner, ending with the 3 dc in the turning ch, ch 1.
Rep Rows 17-21 until shawl is size desired. Finish off, weave in ends.

Alright, here’s a formula…it seems that this lace pattern is a mite trickier for many than I had expected. I’m going to try to make it a bit easier in order that all you have to do is plug in the numbers, and voila! There ya go!

The fan begins with an open shell in its first row, no? Then, the next row of the fan is (dc, ch 1) in each dc and ch-1 space of the first row. The third row is (dc, ch 2) in each dc across the fan, then another row of (dc, ch-1) in each dc and ch-2 space. The fourth row is the foundation row for the shells, alternating between skipping dcs and placing scs in every 2nd ch-1 space. Clear as mud so far?

As the fan pattern repeats, the number of each fan should increase by one. The first fan is made at the beginning of the pattern. Then, the next time open shells are worked there are two fans; the next time, three, and so on. Each new fan is worked between two fans of the previous set. Between each fan are closed shells, which finish off the fans below.

The number of shells between fans diminish by one each row, until there is one shell left between fans. The following row should be a whole row of shells, then following that row would be a row that begins with either a half-shell or sc, then an open shell, and ends with an open shell and half-shell or sc (depending on which repeat you are working).

Between each shell (no matter the type) and fan, there will always be an sc placed in the 3rd dc of the next shell (except during the second set of fans, where there is a dc2tog, skipping the sc. This is the only exception).

As I have previously mentioned somewhere in a post on Ravelry in the CAL group, I don’t believe in mistakes…That’s one reason I despise counting with a passion, as I tend to “eyeball” it and make a guess as to placements. Someone in the group mentioned in her projects page that she’s enjoying watching this shawl grow organically, and I think that’s the whole point of this exercise. This shawl does seem to be organic, and if it seems “off-balance” on some rows, it will inevitably even itself out on the next repeat. Rest assured, it turns out to be symmetric ( *wink* to those of you who constantly need balance!) despite its apparent tendency to be asymmetric. That’s the beauty of this pattern. I’ve enjoyed putting the whole thing together, and crunching the estimations (if I were to say numbers, it would imply that I’m doing row counts, which I don’t do 😛 ) has been a lot of fun.

A couple of the gals asked me about an edging, which will not be necessary around the body of the shawl. You can simply work slip stitches across the top of the shawl, or work scs. I wouldn’t use a shell edging due to the shells that are all throughout the body–it would prove to be a bit much.

I hope this mini-tutorial helps. Basically, this pattern is more of a guideline, and you may do what you want with it. Think outside the box, per se, and be willing to broaden your horizons. Forget about stitch counts, row counts, etc., and if it looks a little wonky, so what? See if you can balance it out with another repeat if you have the yarn.

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1 thought on “Ostrich Feather Fandango Shawl”

  1. I have not tried your pattern yet. It looks wonderful on Ravelery. I wll comment when I have made the shawl. Thanks so much for your giving freely of this pattern. I do appreciate it. Do enjoy my free website, http://www.beadwrangler.com, click on Free Workshops for bead and fiber projects, and Beadwork Samples, for learning beading techniques by making small samples. Thanks again, Lydia

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